Corticosteroid injections for hip osteoarthritis

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  • Citation tools Download this article to citation manager Arroll Bruce , Goodyear-Smith Felicity . Corticosteroid injections for osteoarthritis of the knee: meta-analysis BMJ 2004; 328 :869
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    A total of 159 patients (84 women and 75 men, mean age of 53 (20 to 87)) with subacromial impingement were randomised to treatment with subacromial injections using lidocaine with one of hyaluronic acid (51 patients), corticosteroid (53 patients) or placebo (55 patients). Patients were followed up for 26 weeks. The primary outcome was pain on a visual analogue score (VAS), and secondary outcomes included the Constant Murley score, shoulder pain score, functional mobility score, shoulder disability questionnaire and pain-specific disability score. The different outcome measures showed similar results. After three, six and 12 weeks corticosteroid injections were superior to hyaluronic acid injections and only at six weeks significantly better than placebo injections. The mean short-term reduction in pain on the VAS score at 12 weeks was 7% (SD ; % confidence interval (CI) to ; p = ) in the hyaluronic acid group, 28% (SD ; % CI to ; p < ) in the corticosteroid group and 23% (SD ; % CI to ; p < ) in the placebo group. At 26 weeks there was a reduction in pain in 63% (32 of 51) of patients in the hyaluronic acid group, 72% (38 of 53) of those in the corticosteroid group and 69% (38 of 55) of those in the placebo group. We were not able to show a convincing benefit from hyaluronic acid injections compared with corticosteroid or placebo injections. Corticosteroid injections produced a significant reduction in pain in the short term (three to 12 weeks), but in the long term the placebo injection produced the best results.

    Corticosteroid injections are used as a nonoperative modality to combat acute inflammation when conservative treatments fail. As female patients are regularly seen by orthopedic physicians, it is essential to identify and understand potential sex-related side effects. The aim of this article is to examine available literature for sex-related side effects of orthopedic-related corticosteroid injections. Although the incidence is low, sex-related side effects, such as abnormal menstruation, lactation disturbances, facial flushing, and hirsutism, are associated with corticosteroid injections. Physicians should be aware of these female-specific side effects and relay this information as part of the informed consent process. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(2):e211-e215.].

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    Corticosteroid injections for hip osteoarthritis

    corticosteroid injections for hip osteoarthritis

    This web site is intended for Australian residents and is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Information and interactions contained in this Web site are for information purposes only and are not intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Further, the accuracy, currency and completeness of the information available on this Web site cannot be guaranteed. Dr Me Pty Ltd, its affiliates and their respective servants and agents do not accept any liability for any injury, loss or damage incurred by use of or reliance on the information made available via or through myDr whether arising from negligence or otherwise. See Privacy Policy and Disclaimer .

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